TriVita’s Weekly Wellness Report by Brazos Minshew, TriVita’s Chief Science Officer

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Got energy?

Regardless of what complaint a person has when they visit their doctor, 85% of all patients complain of fatigue. It is one of the “Top 10” reasons for seeking medical help.

People feel tired. We need energy. So, where does energy come from? And, once we get energy, how do we keep it? Let me explain the process by which we produce energy and how we may form strategies to feel energetic every day.

The process of energy
First of all, there is a difference between having energy and feeling energetic. We produce a significant amount of energy even when we are asleep. Yet, most of us don’t feel particularly energetic when we wake up. There are times when we may feel energetic and yet scientific tests actually measure less energy. A good example of this may be seen when a person uses a caffeine-based stimulant such as a cup of coffee or a soft drink. They may feel more alert. Yet, they have less mental energy and they typically score poorly on mental performance tests. That means they cannot really think as well and solve problems as well when they are under the influence of caffeine. More than that, the alertness that they feel comes at a high price: drinking caffeinated beverages will ensure that you feel more fatigue later. The energy that you feel is not real energy.

Metabolism
Real energy is a process of burning calories found in foods and releasing the energy contained within them. This is the process of metabolism. The word metabolism is drawn from a Greek word meaning change. Metabolism changes food into heat. Heat is a form of energy. Therefore, the first step in producing lasting energy is to eat properly so we will have enough fuel to keep our inner fires burning. Betalains, found in Nopalea, prevent these fires of metabolism from becoming fires of inflammation.

Metabolism is governed by hormones that originate in a region of your brain called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus determines your energy needs and sends this information to your pituitary gland. The pituitary gland (often called the Master Gland) translates these signals into hormones and sends these messenger hormones on their way to other various glands. The two prominent glands for energy production are:

  • Adrenal glands – The adrenal glands respond with adrenaline when the hypothalamus detects danger. This process is often called the “fight or flight” response to stress. Adrenaline sends your body into an energy spending spree where it virtually cannibalizes your organ reserves for all of their stored energy. The fires of metabolism are turned down. Your hands and feet get cold and your core body temperature may drop below normal. Even when we are not in danger, caffeine and sugar (as well as other stimulants) mimic this process and trick your system into releasing adrenaline. The adrenaline rush is very addictive but it robs us of true energy. So, the second step in energy production is to turn down the stress response. We do this with adaptogens: plants known to help us reduce the impact of stress.
  • The thyroid – The thyroid gland is responsible for regulating your body temperature by adjusting your metabolism. Two primary fuel sources keep the thyroid gland functioning properly: Iodine and Tyrosine. Iodine is a mineral and Tyrosine is an amino acid – a building block of protein. Tyrosine is considered a non-essential amino acid because we do not need to get it in our diet. We can make it from an essential amino acid (one we must get in our diet) called Phenylalanine (LPA). However, getting Tyrosine in our diets is not a bad thing; it means that we will use less energy making Tyrosine from LPA.

    Nopalea is a good source of dietary Tyrosine and Energy Now! contains both LPA and Tyrosine to fuel healthy energy production. Energy Now! is a nutrient, not a stimulant. The ingredients in Energy Now! can help us feel energetic by supporting healthy metabolism.

Into the brain
Tyrosine and LPA fuel metabolism by supporting healthy thyroid function. Further, these important amino acids foster the sensation of energy and euphoria by serving as the building blocks for other brain chemicals, such as PEA and Nor-Epinephrine. PEA is the “hormone of love” and it is likely the reason why our energy is increased, our pain-perception reduced and even our appetite reduced when we fall in love. We want to support PEA metabolism to feel energetic! Nor-Epinephrine fuels the creation of energy in the brain and supports our nerves as we translate that energy into action.

To get energy from our brain to our body requires healthy nerves. Often, our metabolism is normal – our stress level is low and our nutrient reserves are high and still we do not feel energetic. The problem may not be as much in creating energy as it is in translating that energy through our nerves. Nerve health is supported by Vitamin B-12. People feel fatigued when they lack enough B-12 because they cannot transfer the creation of energy into the sensation of energy.

Conclusion
Health only comes from healthy habits practiced every day. Our bodies rely on nutrients and nurturing to remain healthy. Fatigue is a message from our body that something is wrong – and we need to learn to listen to our body to have energy and to feel energetic!

Take Control of Your Health
  • Practice the 10 Essentials for energy
    • Get your rest and exercise.
    • Eat a nutrient-rich diet.
    • Select relationships that energize you.
  • Support energy production with Energy Now!.
  • Reduce the impact of stress with Adaptogen 10 Plus.
  • Improve the sensation of energy with Vitamin B-12.
  • Decrease the impact of inflammation with Nopalea.

Upcoming Weekly Wellness Reports…

  • OmegaPrime
  • Stress/Anti-stress
Send us your topic suggestions!
If you have specific health topics you’d like Brazos Minshew to discuss in upcoming reports,
click here to submit your suggestions.

Please note that Weekly Wellness Report topics will be chosen at the discretion of Brazos Minshew and based on general relevance.

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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New Hope For Diabetes Sufferers

It is usually the more obvious symptoms, such as unintentional weight loss, excess thirst and urination and fainting that signal the onset of diabetes and spur people to action.

Remember, if you are diagnosed with diabetes, life does not end! However, change is required in order to correct some of the imbalances that led to the development of diabetes in the first place.  Obesity causes approximately 60% of all cases of type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes. Losing weight is very likely to lessen the need for prescription medicine to control diabetes.<P>Second, learning to count carbohydrates is necessary for all people with diabetes in order to keep the blood sugar relatively stable and free of any wild fluctuations. Limiting carbohydrate intake may also minimize the need for insulin.<P>Third, exercise will help improve your body’s natural sensitivity to its own or to any injected insulin you provide.<P>
Many people are not sure why they end up with diabetes. For most, a combination of genetic predisposition and lifestyle habits sets off a slow and steady decline in pancreatic function. This decline is inevitable unless the above lifestyle modifications are introduced. Taking supplements to help keep diabetes away is tempting. But do they really work?<P>

A recent study of middle-aged and older men and women was undertaken to see whether the rate of developing diabetes would be affected by how much Vitamin C was circulating in the blood among the study population’s participants. Vitamin C is a known antioxidant and promotes the well-being of several organ systems, including the heart, blood vessels, skin, gums, teeth and the immune system. This particular study concluded that those individuals with the highest blood levels of Vitamin C were signifi – cantly less likely to develop diabetes over the 12-year study than those with the lowest levels. This is outstanding news! Translating this news into real-world practical advice, if you or any member of your family would like to lessen the risk for developing diabetes, consider eating more Vitamin C-rich foods. Specific Vitamin C-rich foods include: Oranges and other citrus fruits Sweet and hot peppers Cantaloupe Potatoes (baked, not fried) Cherries <P>

If you choose to supplement, be sure you take a high-quality one that contains the appropriate amount to boost your blood level. Healthcare professionals recommend anywhere from several hundreds to several thousands of miligrams of Vitamin C per day.<P>

The crystalline cells in Dr. Libby’s Vital C are one of the primary advantages compared to other Vitamin C supplements, which typically use finely-ground granules instead. That’s because the six-sided, crystalline cell structure provides much more surface area than finely-ground granulated cells. This in turn allows for more thorough and complete nutrient absorption by the body, before the supplement is eliminated.In other words, the crystalline form of Vitamin C releases more of the full potency of the nutrient into your body compared to other forms, even the finely-ground granulated form.<P>

Finally, diabetes is a known risk factor for heart disease, eye disease, skin infections and kidney disease. Fortunately, Vitamin C is known to help improve blood flow and as a antioxidant protects against sun damage to the eyes and skin, as well. <P>

Dr. Libby’s Vital C can be found at: http://www.trivita.com/13170419


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