Alzheimer’s Disease − Separating Facts From Myths

My own family has been touched by Alzheimer’s so it’s very important for me to help you separate the myths from the truth about AD. By having the facts you can better protect yourself against the onset of Alzheimer’s or help your loved ones who are already suffering from the disease.Myth: We see more people with Alzheimer’s disease because of media attention

Truth: The number of people with AD is increasing every year and the percentage of people with AD in North America is increasing, though the lifespan is getting shorter. The number of people with Alzheimer’s disease is increasing at an alarming rate. There is no cure. Currently, over 500 clinical trials are being conducted just to find a way to slow down the runaway epidemic of AD. But trying to reversethe damage of AD once the disease has progressed is like trying to hold back the tide with your bare hands: there is little hope of success. Prevention and slowing the progress of AD are the only hopes we currently have. Year after year we watch as this disease steals the people we love. The irony of this disease is so disheartening: AD strikes when we are at the richest point in life in terms of experience and wisdom.

Myth: Alzheimer’s disease is genetic; there is nothing we can do about it.

Truth: AD is the accumulation of many years of damage to your brain, causing plaque to build up and nerves to tangle. There are prevention strategies that work to help reduce the damage to our brain and to reduce the chances of AD. The chances of being diagnosed with AD increase as we age. AD affects about half of people age 85 and older. However, this is more a product of biological age than chronological age. In other words, AD has more to do with how well we are aging rather than how many days we cross off our calendar! AD is a disease of accumulation: every trauma to our head, every toxin that poisons our brain, every stressful day and every moment we are nutrient-defi cient add to the accumulated damage to our brain. This is biological aging and it has little to do with the calendar. Genetics absolutely plays a role in AD development. We can often get a glimpse into our genetics by looking at our homocysteine (HCY) levels. The higher the blood levels of HCY, the greater the likelihood we will develop AD. A gene defect that predisposes a person to AD is called the MTHFR defect. It is common in about 40% of people. This gene pumps out HCY in very high amounts. What is the solution for elevated HCY? Foods and food supplements rich in B vitamins. (A published clinical trial of HCY Guard demonstrated that it reduced elevated HCY levels by 35% in just 42 days!) So, while there are definite genetic markers to help us determine our AD risk, there are also proven strategies to help us protect against the damage that may lead to AD. Reduce your risk by reducing toxic, inflammatory, brain-destroying levels of homocysteine.

Myth: Only drugs are powerful enough to stop Alzheimer’s disease

Truth: AD prevention depends to a large extent on the choices we make every day.

According to the National Institutes of Health, the majority of AD prevention strategies rest in our own hands. And, while experimental drugs and vaccines offer some hope of prevention, proven strategies exist that you can use today:

* Reduce toxins, including toxic levels of HCY * Meticulously manage your blood pressure, blood sugar and LDL (“bad” cholesterol) levels * Increase antioxidants and nutrient-dense foods * Supplement your diet with proven nutrients for healthy aging * Reduce inflammation with Omega-3 essential fatty acids * Protect your head from injury * Exercise every day and get your rest every night * Stay socially engaged * Commit yourself to lifelong learning.

During National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, let’s use this opportunity to learn all we can about AD prevention strategies and implement them daily.

To protect yourself from dangerous levels of HCY and to implement AD prevention visit:http://www.trivita.com/13170419


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